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Dealing with Drama

Counselors suggest positive influences and mindset

Student+checks+her+phone+for+messages.+Drama+can+be+started+through+texting.+Photo+by+Ryan+Pham
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Dealing with Drama

Student checks her phone for messages. Drama can be started through texting. Photo by Ryan Pham

Student checks her phone for messages. Drama can be started through texting. Photo by Ryan Pham

Student checks her phone for messages. Drama can be started through texting. Photo by Ryan Pham

Student checks her phone for messages. Drama can be started through texting. Photo by Ryan Pham

Ryan Pham and Jay Bowen, Staff Writter

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Drama is a very common experience for all high school teenagers. Gossip, relationships, bullies, popularity , are all big factors in the everyday high school society. Some would say that girls go through the most drama. Others think that boys usually brush people off. But high school is the time for people to grow into a responsible adult and gain tolerance, according to guidance counselor Erica Spraggins, who advises students on how to deal with drama.
“Separate yourself,” Spraggins said. “Again, this is easier said than done, but by not placing yourself in the mix–even as a bystander watching it happen, encouraging from the sidelines–can limit any stress and heartache that might come along. In addition, giving social media a break (start out small, like a few days, maybe a week) can really help. From what I hear, a lot happens on social media that trickles into school.”
Drama affects the way some students think or behave during school when they are involved in drama.
“[Drama] distracts them from their school work, puts stress on them, impacts their relationships with others potentially, can keep students out of class which can cause them to get behind/grades to drop,” guidance counselor Priscilla Greenwood said.
Negative energy can be really draining for some people especially when you have to be around it every day.
“Sometimes I can just ignore the drama, but when it hits close to the heart it makes school unenjoyable,” junior Naomi Kessler said.
People have many ways to deal with drama; not all ways are good, but it’s whatever gets a person through it. Kessler explains how she deals with it through friends and basically pouring all her emotions through friends.
“Usually I drown out drama by being the bigger person or just putting it out of my head for the day by talking to other people,” sophomore Molly Heitz said.
Solving drama isn’t always easy, people must learn to grow or be the bigger person.
“I usually try to confront it but then if it doesn’t fix itself I like try to compromise again and also put myself in their shoes,” Kessler said. “If it’s just too much then the friendship just kind of dies. [I try to] put myself into their shoes to see their side and then talk to them about how I feel as well as clearing up anything they may be feeling,” Kessler said.
Drama isn’t always easy to deal with for everyone to deal with especially when you have to deal with school.
“We’re all human. It’s simple to say “ignore,” but this is obviously easier said than done. All you can really do is try. Try to become more self aware and decide if you’re at the point in your life where you’re tired of being in drama,” Spraggins said.
Greenwood gives students ways to block out drama that are proactive, instead of just ignoring.
“Stay involved with positive influences, surround yourself with friends that lift you up and don’t bring you down. Involvement in school activities and school work – spending your time working on school related things rather than dwelling on or focusing on any drama happening on social media, etc,” Greenwood said.
Does drama affect grades? Some people believe drama doesn’t distract them, but it usually does. One of the most common drama in high school usually comes with gossip or couples. On example is when friend A dates friend B’s ex without telling them. This may sound cliché but in high school this happens quite a lot. Dramas such as these affect a person dramatically. Putting aside drama is what most people want to do but that is lot harder than one might expect.
“Whether students are able to see it or not, it a) impedes on their education, causing lack of focus on their studies which can lead into a domino effect with final grades, credits, etc. There are probably a lot of students who can produce so much more in their work ethic and abilities, but might be more consumed on what’s happening in their social circles; b) impacts their relationships with one another; lack of trust in friend groups which, of course, can lead into another domino effect; c) one’s reputation can be affected,” Spraggins said.
In high school students never have to deal with anything alone because there are many resources.
“I can always talk to my friends and my sister about drama and things that are going on. Surrounding myself with good people who don’t get into drama in the first place,” Heitz said.
Knowing who your friends are, and knowing who to trust and whore not to trust is a good way to know what you’re putting yourself in.
“Putting too much trust into someone who has already shown you (in many ways) who they really are. If you don’t want your business out there, then don’t share it,” Spraggins said.
When girls tend to fall out with their friends they aren’t as happy, because they start to miss each other, but no one is bold enough to say it.
“I’ve noticed that people repair broken relationships when they miss that person or just miss the friendship. I’ve noticed that this usually gets people to suck up their pride and go fix whatever the problem was in their relationship,” Kessler said.
Fixing problems and putting your feelings aside to resolve a situation can be hard. You just have to grow up and admit your faults.
“Having students talk in person can be very healing and effective. Sometimes this does not resolve the drama, but almost always it can be a step in the right direction,” Greenwood said.
Showing others that you respect their feelings and that you really want to fix it helps take some anger out of the situation.
“I think if students would just apologize to each other then they could easily resolve things,” Heitz said.
A lot of situations get blown out of proportion because of outside people looking in on personal issues.
“I guess the most common issue I have with people is the fact that when one person has a small issue with someone, they escalate it and start to ignore the person they have an issue with. And the issue is that they don’t just talk out the drama to try and solve it which is just super frustrating,” Kessler said.
Drama can be very draining but don’t ever let it get the best of you, be yourself , be happy.
“Focus more on your happiness and what you want your experiences to be. Surround yourself with other positive people,” Spraggins said.

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